February Shoutouts: Check out a Hot Tip about Collecting Customer Info in Klaviyo!

  • 11 February 2022
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February Shoutouts: Check out a Hot Tip about Collecting Customer Info in Klaviyo!
Userlevel 6
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:two_hearts::chocolate_bar: Happy Valentines Season Everyone! I’m sure it’s not that much of a secret by now, but you all are our special valentines and we are absolutely head over heels for our Community members! :heart_eyes::love_letter::cupid:

 

Speaking of things near and dear to our hearts this lovey-dovey season, our mission is to nurture an inclusive platform for inspiration, strategic advice, and meaningful collaboration. What makes our Community special is the ability for our users to engage in peer-to-peer support and offer solutions or best practices to others looking for answers or advice. 

 

We want to celebrate and give a Community Shoutout to users who are embodying this collaborative and helpful spirit by going out of their way to offer guidance to others in our Community! 

 

A big thanks to these users: 

  • @bricatfree
  • @Travis
  • @Spark Bridge Digital LLC
  • @vitbarreto
  • @cdetdi

 

:fire: Hot Tip :fire: : Check out @Travis’s helpful response to our own @vitbarreto’s question on how to get the most bang for our buck when it comes to collecting customer information in Klaviyo! 

 

 

 

 :loudspeaker: Question to the Community :loudspeaker: : What are some of your favorite and efficient ways to collect important customer information? 

 

 

XoXoXo, 

 

Chloe, David, Dov, Stephen, Alex and Taylor 


5 replies

Userlevel 5
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Great question @Taylor Tarpley! Personally, I’m a fan of incorporating question asking into the email template/campaign/flow itself. Few example use cases:

  • Let’s say you’re in the food industry and have dairy free/allergy free options. You can send a campaign to an engaged audience and in the email, you can include a question like “Let us know if any of these apply to you” with the responses “Dairy Free,” Gluten Free,” “Peanut Free,”  etc. As recipients answer these questions, their profiles in Klaviyo will get appended with their responses. This way when you launch a new food item (ice-cream, baked good, etc.) that applies to a specific allergy group, you can send a targeted campaign to this audience. Speaking from experience, I’ve driven out of my way for some dairy free ice-cream after getting an email about that week’s flavor! 🍦
  • You can include an email at the end of your abandoned cart flow to get a better understanding of why someone hasn’t made the purchase. You may discover some interesting insights. The final email would NOT include the item in the shopping cart because at this point they’ve already received your abandoned cart messages and have not made a purchase and you’re not trying to push a conversion - this is a fact finding mission :eyes: . You can then ask a question such as “Help us understand why you left this item in your cart” with the responses “I’m no longer interested in the item,” “I found the item at a better price,” “Shipping was more expensive than the item itself,” etc. 

If you’re interested in learning how to ask questions and collect responses in your emails, check out this help article

 

Would love to hear of some other examples!

~ Julie

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Thanks for the shoutout! :blush:

Userlevel 3
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Collecting zero-party data from customers is CRUCIAL in really understanding your target audiences. I recently recorded an episode of the Klaviyo Growth Podcast featuring Ben Parr from Octane AI where we talked about all of the different ways you can creatively collect data from customers (listen here if you’re interested in his take!) 

One of the easiest and most intuitive ways to collect information about subscribers is to leverage signup form targeting. Signup forms are great for collecting email addresses and phone numbers, but did you know that you can target forms at existing Klaviyo profiles (i.e. they’ve already given you their email address)? Signup form targeting is a simple way to improve a user’s on-site experience while collecting more information about them. For example, you can target users who have browsed three pages and then prompt them to fill out a form asking them what they’re shopping for. With this information, you can provide scalable, personalized shopping assistance. Just one example, but there are so many creative ways to target forms! You can target a form to any segment or list within your Klaviyo account. 

Userlevel 6
Badge +20

 

 :loudspeaker: Question to the Community :loudspeaker: : What are some of your favorite and efficient ways to collect important customer information? 

 

Great question! One of my favourite ways is using a quiz/survey (and it depends on the brand and how much information you want to collect).

 

For example, Typeform has an integration with Klaviyo.  Building out a survey funnel is easy on Typeform and all the responses get added to the subscribers profile. 

 

You see this in the beauty industry a lot.  However, one way I’ve used it in a non-beauty category (apparel) is by doing a member of the month feature in a newsletter.  To get a chance to be featured, members need to fill out a profile form.  A campaign goes out with a link to the submission form (a Typeform survey) where they answer questions such as product preferences, demographics, buying behaviours, etc.

Userlevel 6
Badge +20
  • You can include an email at the end of your abandoned cart flow to get a better understanding of why someone hasn’t made the purchase. You may discover some interesting insights. The final email would NOT include the item in the shopping cart because at this point they’ve already received your abandoned cart messages and have not made a purchase and you’re not trying to push a conversion - this is a fact finding mission :eyes: . You can then ask a question such as “Help us understand why you left this item in your cart” with the responses “I’m no longer interested in the item,” “I found the item at a better price,” “Shipping was more expensive than the item itself,” etc. 

 

LOVE this.  The way we currently do it is they can reply with an open-ended answer, but I like this tactic better to give options (low friction vs typing out an email explaining why - which not many people do).

 

To take this idea further, after they pick an option, you can have them go into a segment that triggers a flow which sends a response based on what they picked.  So many ideas here!

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