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Segmentation-sending to an entire list

  • 23 January 2024
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Hi!

I’m used to lighting up my whole list on fire with a killer offer.

But now that I’ve read some klaviyo articles on batch-sending and how it’s a thing of the past, I might have overdone it… 😏

I’ve sent the same, slightly altered, email to 4 different segments and I don’t really know who I missed on the list (it was a 2+1 sale so I guessed the entire list would want to know about it),

also, have I accidentally sent the slightly altered email to the same profiles (there was +1h time difference in send time)?

Could anyone link me up or otherwise explain what’s the logic behind segmentations [especially when one wants to send it to the full list]?


I know its goal is to increase open, click and lastly conversion rate - for me this works well in theory, in practice I’m lost. 

 

Thanks, 
Jože

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Best answer by KatherineB 23 January 2024, 17:28

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Hi @JozeSlobodnik  - great question!

 

If you have a super engaged list, there’s nothing inherently wrong with sending a campaign to everyone. Where segmentation plays a role is if you are sending several emails a week, you may want to target different sets of subscribers with different types of messaging. If you send every email to your whole list, you may get list fatigue and notice subs not engaging as much because they are overwhelmed with the amount of emails. 

For example, if I am sending a sale email about Product A, I would want to exclude customers who recently purchased Product A (so they don’t try to return the product and buy again to get the discount). However, maybe customers who recently purchased Product A might be interested in Product B, so I might send Product A customers a sale about Product B. 

Klaviyo has a great article about how to create customer engagement tiers. I especially find the “Nearly Theres”, “Waiting for Wows”, and “Espresso Shot” segments very valuable. 

Hope this helps. Segmentation is a really great tool to keep your list engaged and feeling special!

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Hi, Katherine! 
Thank you for a great answer. 

So I would have to create a cross-sell segment in order to offer product A and vice versa?

Yes, that article has become THE inspiration for my segments. Do you have any other (maybe even non-klaviyo related) sources where I could learn more about segmentation?

 

Best, 
Jože

 

 
 
 
Userlevel 6
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HI @JozeSlobodnik so glad it helped!

You could certainly create a cross-sell segment of people who have bought product A and you want to sell them Product B, and use that for campaigns OR flows. 

I often like to exclude any recent buyers from campaigns since they are getting post purchase emails and they just took the action we wanted them to (they placed an order) so we don’t want to overwhelm them with more email. Depending on your product and its lifecycle, I typically like to exclude folks who bought in the last 7 or 14 days from campaigns. I don’t have any non-klaviyo resources off the top of my head, but here are some different ways you can segment your list, based on your goals: 
By:​​​​​​

  • customer or prospect
  • order value or number of orders
  • location
  • what they buy
  • where they click
  • the pages they viewed
  • where the lead came from
  • how recently they’ve engaged with your site or with email/sms (ie. 30 days engaged, 60 days engaged, 90 days engaged)

Okay actually I lied: Neil Patel lays out email segmentation strategy really nicely 

 

Good luck!

Userlevel 6
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Hey @JozeSlobodnik!

 

We love a killer offer. Glad to hear you’re leaning into more segmenting now! 

 

@KatherineB gave you good tips to get started - the Espresso Shot segment is also a personal favorite of mine. It can sometimes be small, but mighty when you send those super active shoppers the right offer. 

 

Segmenting is one of the things I’m personally most passionate about, since it helps you gain insight into the different groups of people you have in your list as well as increasing engagement with emails as the content becomes more relevant to the recipients. 

 

Here’s an article I wrote about different types of segments you can use to analyze your list and identify opportunities for flow building as well as campaigns! 

 

Happy to chat further if this sparks any questions for you.

 

Also, if you want to dive into the more advanced side of what’s possible with profile enrichment and segmentation, you might enjoy this recent community thread as well… 

 

Warmly,

Gabrielle

 

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Katherine and Gabrielle, thank you very much!

I’ve created new segments based on the How to create segments Klaviyo article. They don’t seem to be one size fits all but it’s an excellent start.

I will only engage the full list when there’s a huge seasonal sale. 

Your advice on not bothering recent purchasers with too many new newsletters sounds legit, I shall apply a new condition to all my segments with 1+ placed orders: do not send to profiles who placed order in the last X days.

How many days do you recommend, 3 days maybe?
We sell women’s clothing and do not have a post-purchase flow (don’t ask why).

 

Best, 
Jože

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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You’re quite welcome @JozeSlobodnik! Sounds like you’re on the right track...

 

I’d recommend you test different timeframes when deciding who to exclude from receiving certain campaign emails. If the newsletter/ campaign email has editorial content that’s not asking someone to make another purchase, how recently they placed their order matters less… So you could focus on a more general segment of your active subscribers (in the last 30 days). Then in order to make sure people who are receiving post-purchase flows don’t get 2 emails in the same day, you could use smart sending with your campaign so the flow emails are prioritized for that recipient.

 

When it comes to a campaign that’s more product/ sales focused, this is the most important time to exclude a recent order. To decide that timeframe, I’d start with understanding what your avg time from “placed order” to “order delivered” is. If someone has not yet received their order, the likelihood of them being frustrated by a prompt to place another order is much higher. So that helps you determine if it’s the last 5, 7, or maybe even 14 days. 

 

That said, if the campaign is sending out “new arrivals” or “new products” that the recent customer wouldn’t have seen while they were shopping, then you could narrow that window to “has Placed Order at least once in the last 3 days” and exclude those people from receiving the campaign. That way, the people who placed an order within the last week can still see the new products. 

 

Basically, consider the potential for creating a customer service problem when deciding what your timeframe is for “not bothering” people. Asking them to buy again before they receive the original item they ordered is likely to cause a problem for your customer service team, so that’s the fundamental principle guiding all the technical implementation of deciding which segments you INCLUDE, and which segments you EXCLUDE. 

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Thank you, Katherine!
 

These paragraphs struck a chord with me:

“If the newsletter/ campaign email has editorial content that’s not asking someone to make another purchase, how recently they placed their order matters less…”

“if the campaign is sending out “new arrivals” or “new products” that the recent customer wouldn’t have seen while they were shopping, then you could narrow that window to “has Placed Order at least once in the last 3 days” and exclude those people from receiving the campaign. That way, the people who placed an order within the last week can still see the new products.”

and

“Asking them to buy again before they receive the original item they ordered is likely to cause a problem for your customer service team”

 

I’ll try to apply them.

Best, 

Jože

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
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Just jumping in with a small insight:

 

Segmentation and the usage of the Audience Breakdown functionality gives you the possibility to see how the different segments interact with your campaigns.

 

Say, if you set up three segments - one with subscribers without purchase, one with customers who have purchased 1 time and one with repeat customers - you are basically still sending to the entire list, but what you’ll gain are insights about how campaigns and content drive engagement across various segments. You’ll discover what type of content will result in most new clients, what type of content resonates best with your first time customers and what content leads to the highest increase in CLV amongst your repeat customers.

 

Segmentation is not only about delivering different content - it’s also about driving more insights. :-)

 

Hope this helps!

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